Join us on the Thrivable World Quest on the Island of Sustainability and Organisational Evolution

The Thrivable World Quest is a global quest to chart how organizations must be so people and the planet can thrive. It mixes delightful, engaging in-person events and a kick-ass information platform which allows us to share the ‘booty’ across cities and with the world.

The quest seeks to document, elaborate and accelerate the wave of “positive mutation” that is already transforming how we conceive of organizations and how work is done, so that our collective actions more consistently create the conditions essential for life to thrive at every level.

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Guest Blog – Sustainable transport – Driven to destruction?

One of the great ironies of the Paris Climate Change Conference is the carbon footprint left by the 40,000 attendees who have journeyed across the globe to visit the French capital. It’s estimated that 300,000 tonnes of CO2 was generated by the two week summit, and Barack Obama’s travel arrangements alone will send more carbon dioxide into the air than the combined annual emissions of 31 US homes.

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Guest blog – Rainforests why they matter

Half of the world’s rainforest has been destroyed in the last 40 years. It continues to be lost at an ever increasing rate. Protecting the remaining rainforests is pivotal to the climate change agenda because of their crucial role in absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. But forest also provide a habitat for incredible biodiversity, and livelihoods for millions of people.

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On the twelfth day of COPmas my eco love said to me… twelve turbines spinning…#12COP21

Renewable energy technologies are gaining ground rapidly. According to the International Energy Agency, in 2013, 13.5% of the planet’s total energy was supplied by renewable sources. They have been growing at a steady 2.2% each year from 1990. Even more impressively, renewables were the world’s third largest electricity production source, at nearly 21.6% in 2013, behind coal (41%) and a smidgeon behind gas (21.8%), but kicking nuclear into fourth place (10.6%).

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